Best Sauce Pans

Best Sauce Pans

best sauce pans

The Way We Chosen

We focused on testing fully clad, tri-ply pans, with a few five-ply options from new brands we haven’t tested and one cheap option with an encapsulated bottom. Sarah Kobos. Through years of extensive testing we discovered that not all saucepans work the same way at simple tasks. Certain saucepans stand out because of their materials, design, construction, and other features. Based on our research, expert interviews, and personal cooking experience, we determined that a great sauce pan should meet the following criteria: Fully clad tri-ply: We mainly focused on fully-clad tri-ply stainless steel pans. Tri-ply is an aluminum core sandwiched among layers of stainless. Aluminum heats quicker than steel. Steel is harder and retains heat better, so tri-ply has both. A fully-clad pan has the aluminum core reaching up to the sides. This allows for heat distribution that is more even than pans with only an aluminum base. Other multi-ply pans, like five- or seven-ply, are more expensive than tri-ply but don’t always heat more evenly. They’re also heavier and take longer to heat up, so generally we avoided them. Made In sauciers (5-ply) and Misen five-ply sauciers (10-ply), were our exceptions. These were both relatively affordable, and we were excited to explore these new brands. However, after trying them out, tri-ply remains our favorite choice for a saucepan. Although anodized and aluminum pans are cheaper than triply, they don’t have the same quality. The metallic flavor of aluminum can be caused by acidic foods such as tomatoes. Although anodized aluminum isn’t reactive, it has a dark color that makes seeing when foods are browning difficult. Nonstick Pans: These pans don’t have the same durability as stainless steel pans without nonstick coatings. The nonstick coatings are easy to scratch, will degrade with high heat and will eventually deteriorate even after years of good care. The good tri-ply saucepan can, however, stand up to years of use. Most nonstick coatings are also dark in color, which again makes it harder to see browning or tell if your caramel is burning. To incorporate ingredients in recipes like pastry cream and rice risotto you will be able to reach almost every corner of the saucier. Photo by Sarah Kobos Saucepan and saucier. We looked at two types of pans that are subtly distinct: curved sauciers or basic, straight-walled saucepans. Saucepans have straighter walls, narrower openings and are generally less expensive and work well for the majority of basic cooking tasks. Even though sauciers tend to be more expensive, the curvilinear sides and large openings of saucepans enable you to easily stir things like risottos. 2.-3 quarts. We believe that 2 quarts should be the right size for a small saucepan. With a pan this size, you can dump in a 28-ounce can of tomatoes for sauce, reheat soupy leftovers, make oatmeal, or boil water for tea and the pan is still lightweight and compact. Most sauciers can only be made in 3 quart sizes. For certain tasks, such as making rice or risotto, it is better to use a saucier that has a greater capacity.
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best sauce pans

Our Pick

best sauce pans

The Best 3-Quart Saucier For Every Cook: Misen


We found the Misen 3-quart saucepan the most cost-effective option for high quality. It excelled at every test, offering thorough and even heat distribution, easy pouring from the rimmed lip, an ultra-comfortable stay-cool handle, and a snug-fitting lid that allowed little to no steam to escape. Most importantly, it has even heat distribution thanks to “5-ply” construction which means there are five layers of steel and aluminum all the way up to the lip (rather than contained only in the base). Misen was thicker with a heavier base than any other pans. The Misen pan heated much more slowly than other saucepans when it was melting sugar for caramel. Although slow heating might seem disadvantageous at first glance, this is a great thing for lemon curd or any other custard, which can transform from shiny and smooth to creamy in just a few seconds. The thicker, more heavy pot heats the pan slower, providing a little buffer to delicate jobs.


The Misen’s rounded base allows a whisk to easily reach the corners of the pan. Another advantage is that the pan’s saucier design allows for more egg poaching than a traditional saucepan. You will also find that steam collects on the surface, and liquids reduce faster. This can be either an asset (or a liability depending on your job), but you can still partially cover the pan to stop evaporation. We found the Misen’s extra thick, angled handle to be more convenient and comfortable than other pans. It’s an inexpensive, high-quality pan that can be used in many everyday cooking tasks.

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best sauce pans

The Absolute Best Saucepans You Can Buy Right Now

best sauce pans

The Handle

best sauce pans

Making Saucepans


Let’s get on to the cooking part! This testing was done with 4-quart saucepans. However, I also included 3-quart pans if they were the biggest size that the pan came in. The best saucepans have tall walls and straight sides, which don’t cut down on the saucepan’s usable cooking area. Lighter interiors make saucepans more useful than those with darker interiors. This is especially true if the saucepan is used to brown butter, or to saute aromatics in risotto. Credit to Riddley Gemperlein – Schirm. It’s easier to see how browning has been done with saucepans that have light interiors (left) and not with saucepans that have dark interiors.

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best sauce pans

What We Look For In A Saucepan

best sauce pans

Scoring Criteria

best sauce pans

Learn More

What Sauce Pan Is the Best?

  1. Stellar Stay Cool Draining Saucepan Set Non-Stick.
  2. Robert Welch Campden 3-piece saucepan set.
  3. Le Creuset Non-Stick Toughened 3-Piece Saucepan Set.
  4. Tower Scandi 3 Piece Set.
  5. Circulon Origins 5-piece Cookware Set.
  6. GreenPan Venice Pro 3 Piece.
  7. Set 5 Pieces of Stellar Hard Anodised Pan Set in 5 Pieces

What Sauce Pans Are Chefs Most Use?

  1. Aluminu is the most commonly used fry/saute pan by professional chefs.
  2. Stainless Stee
  3. Coppe
  4. Cast Iron and each has it’s own particular characteristics and advantages

What material is best for making sauce pan handle?

Handles made from stainless steel are considered the finest metal handles. This is because stainless steel heats up significantly slower than iron or carbon steel handles. The design of the handle also influences how quickly a handle heats up. February 10, 2021

What are The Top Non-stick Saucepans?

Calphalon 10-Piece Nostick Cookware is Best.

.Best Sauce Pans